Morganton City Council meetings are broadcast live on CoMPAS Ch. 2 and streamed live online via the city's USTREAM i ustream. The Council meets at Morganton City Hall located at 305 E. Union St. Suite A100, Morganton, NC .

 

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Photos 

Resolution honoring K-9 Shrek

Council honored K-9 officer Shrek for his six years of service to the City of Morganton Public Safety Department. Shrek’s end of watch came on May 25, 2017 when he had to be humanely put down due to severe health problems. Read more at http://bit.ly/2rAGVuz.

WATCH THE VIDEO

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Councilman John Cantrell, Mayor Pro Tem, District 3, left, presents a resolution honoring K-9 Shrek to Public Safety Officer Stacey Huffman, Shrek's handler, during the City Council meeting Monday night, June 5, 2017.

RESOLUTION RETIRING K-9 Shrek
A CANINE ASSIGNED TO THE
MORGANTON DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY

WHEREAS, police canine Shrek has faithfully served the Morganton Department of Public Safety since he was placed into service in June, 2011; and

WHEREAS, Shrek has been assigned to PSO Stacey Huffman for a period of 3 ½ years of service; and

WHEREAS, Shrek has been certified by the North American Police Working Dog Association the following areas:

• Obedience
• Narcotic detection (marijuana, cocaine, crack cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy and heroin)
• Tracking
• Area search
• Article search
• Apprehension

WHEREAS, Shrek has assisted in the location of several missing children, and the apprehension of multiple suspects; and

WHEREAS, Shrek has made numerous finds of controlled substances; and

WHEREAS, Shrek has rendered a valuable service to the Morganton Department of Public Safety along with the community in which he served; and

WHEREAS, Shrek has performed his canine responsibilities as a professional police dog with the highest standards; and

WHEREAS, Shrek was approaching seven years of service and developed physical difficulty carrying out his duties; and

WHEREAS, Shrek’s end of watch came on May 25, 2017 when he had to be humanely put down due to severe health problems; and

WHEREAS, Section 160A-266(d) of the North Carolina General Statutes provides, in pertinent part, that a “city may discard any personal property that ...possesses a potential threat to the public health or safety.”

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Morganton as follows:

Section 1. Police canine Shrek is hereby retired from service.

Section 2. The City expresses its appreciation to the late police canine Shrek for his years of faithful service, and honors his memory.

This Resolution was adopted by the Morganton City Council in open session during a regular meeting held on the 5th day of June, 2017.

 

Lookadoo recognized for 30 Years' of Service

Council recognized Public Works Director Scott Lookadoo for 30 years of service to the City.

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Councilman Sidney Simmons, left, presented a 30-Year Pin to Public Works Director Scott Lookadoo during the City Council meeting Monday night, June 5, 2017.

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Agenda

REGULAR MEETING
CITY COUNCIL

June 5, 2017

Ronnie Thompson, Mayor 
John H. Cantrell )
Forrest A. Fleming ) Councilmen
Sidney Simmons )
Vacant Seat )

Sally W. Sandy, City Manager
Louis E. Vinay, Jr., City Attorney

Becky Brinkley, Interpreter

I. Call to Order in the Council Chamber at City Hall at 6:00 p.m.

II. Public Comment – 6:00 – 6:15 p.m.

Anyone wishing to speak during this time must sign in with the Clerk before the meeting begins, and upon being called will have 3 minutes to address the Council.

III. Business of the Council begins at 6:15 p.m.

IV. Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag

V. Invocation to be Given by the Rev. David Doster, Burke Community Bible Church

VI. Introduction of Council

VII. Retiree Resolution

• K-9 Shrek, Morganton Department of Public Safety

VIII. Service Pin

• Scott Lookadoo, Director of Public Works, 30 years

IX. Public Advocacy Issues and Strategies

a. Upcoming events:

• Downtown: TGIF concerts continue on Friday nights

  • Farmer’s Market, Saturdays and Wednesdays
  • State of Origin Brew Festival, June 10, 5:00 – 9:00 p.m., Old Courthouse Square

• Presentation of Draft Downtown Masterplan, June 7, 5:30 p.m. reception, 6:00 p.m. presentation, CoMMA

• Public Input Meeting / Recreation Masterplan, June 8, 6:00 p.m. Mt. View Recreation Center

• Red, White & Bluegrass Festival, July 1-3, Catawba Meadows Festival Area

• FREE Independence Day Celebration, Catawba Meadows Park, 5:00 p.m. until (Fireworks at approximately 9:30 p.m.)

X. North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1 Update

XI. Consent Agenda – All items below are considered to be routine and will be enacted by one motion. There will be no separate discussion of these items unless a Council member, staff member or citizen so requests. In the event a request is made, the item will be removed from the consent agenda and considered under Item XII.

A. Approval of Minutes – For a Regular Meeting held on May 1, 2017 and Special Meetings held on February 27 and May 1, 2017.

RECOMMENDED ACTION: Approve minutes as submitted.

B. Consideration of a Project Closure Resolution and Budget Amendment / Water Clearwell

RECOMMENDED ACTION: Approve a resolution to formally close out the Fund 60 (Clearwell) Capital Project and approve a budget amendment in the amount of $3,836 to close out the Water Clearwell Capital Project.

C. Consideration of a Budget Amendment / IRMS

RECOMMENDED ACTION: Approve a budget amendment in the amount of $43,976 to appropriate ARC grant funds and the City’s grant match for the downtown Wi-Fi project.

D. Consideration to Declare Equipment Surplus

RECOMMENDED ACTION: Declare as surplus equipment a 2007 Freightliner/Allianz Johnston Sweeper truck and a 2008 International/Heil rear loader garbage truck.

XII. Items Removed from Consent Agenda

XIII. Presentation of Proposed Budget for FY 2017-2018, Presented by Sally Sandy, City Manager

a. Call for a Public Hearing on the Proposed Budget on Monday, June 19, 2017, 6:00 p.m.

XIV. Old Business

1. Consideration of Removing $20 Vehicle Tax

XV. New Business

A. Public Hearings and Actions

1. Public Hearing to Consider Rezoning a 20.52 Acre Portion of a 37.42 Acre Tract of Property Located at 925 N Green Street from Low Intensity District (LID) to High Intensity District (HID) Submitted by Nathan Tidd Agent for Crescent Communities

2. Public Hearing to Consider Rezoning Approximately 54.45 Acres Located at 526 Causby Road from Exclusive Industrial District (EID) to Medium Intensity District (MID) Submitted by Howard E. Poole Trustees

B. Other Business

2. Consideration of Neighborhood-wide Speed Limit of 25 mph in the Residential Neighborhood that Includes Brittain Drive, White Pine Lane and Glendale Street

3. Consideration of Ordinance Establishing a Speed Limit of 25 mph on the Portion of Vine Arden Road North of the Kirksey Bypass

4. Consideration of Neighborhood-wide Speed Limit of 25 mph in the Residential Neighborhood that Includes Kimberly Drive and North Fox Street

5. Appointments to Boards and Commissions

a. Human Relations Commission
b. Board of Adjustment
c. Cable Commission
d. Community Appearance
e. Main Street Advisory
f. Planning & Zoning
g. Recreation Advisory

XVI. Other Items from City Manager and City Council Not on Agenda

XVII. Reports

XVIII. Adjournment

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Minutes

Minutes for this meeting will be posted after they are approved by the City Council. The Council normally approves minutes during the following Council meeting.

MINUTES
REGULAR MEETING
CITY COUNCIL

June 5, 2017 

Ronnie Thompson, Mayor 
John H. Cantrell )
Forrest A. Fleming ) Councilmen
Sidney Simmons )
Vacant Seat )

Sally W. Sandy, City Manager 
Louis E. Vinay, Jr., City Attorney

Becky Brinkley, Interpreter

I. Call to Order – The Meeting was called to order in the Council Chamber at City Hall at 6:00 p.m. by Mayor Thompson.

II. Public Comment – The Mayor stated the guidelines for public comment and said speakers were to be called in order of sign-up.

• Chris Corpening resides at 104 First Avenue. She stated there are two big trees that are dead in front of her house and expressed concern they might fall. The Mayor stated that Scott Lookadoo would go out the following morning to take a look at the issue.

• William Pate works at Case Farms, 121 Rand Street. He expressed concern with the proposed water/sewer rate increases. He stated that he understands infrastructure work is needed but after the increase Case Farms will pay more than $19 million for water/sewer. Pate stated that they, too have infrastructure needs and are adding to their equipment at a cost of about $5 million. He stated he realizes costs rise but it would be easier to swallow if it didn’t happen at once. Pate stated what makes the City more attractive to businesses are the lower water rates.

No other speakers were signed up so the Mayor recessed the meeting at 6:04 p.m.

III. Business of the Council – The Mayor reconvened the meeting at 6:15 p.m.

IV. Pledge of Allegiance – The Pledge was led by Councilman Fleming.

V. Invocation – The invocation was given by the Rev. David Doster, Burke Community Bible Church.

VI. Introduction of Council – The Mayor introduced the Council and staff.

VII. Retiree Resolution – The Mayor read a resolution in honor of K-9 Shrek, Morganton Department of Public Safety, now deceased.

Councilman Cantrell presented Resolution #17-22 to Shrek’s partner/handler, PSO Stacey Huffman.

Huffman expressed her thanks for the support during Shrek’s illness and her appreciation for Council support in getting a new dog.

VIII. Service Pin – The Personnel Committee and City staff have decided to recognize long-term employees for years of service at a Council meeting.

The Council honored Scott Lookadoo, Director of Public Works, with a 30 year service pin presented by Councilman Simmons.

The City Manager expressed what a pleasure it is to work with Scott on a daily basis, he is a team player. Scott thanked the Council for their direction and thanked Sally for her management. He stated it was a pleasure to work with professional employees dedicated to quality service. He stated his thanks to Teresa Massey for all she does for their department and the City. Scott thanked his supervisors: Tim Clay and Scott Stewart – Streets; Richard Cope – Sanitation; Steven Mills and Jim Pless – Cemeteries and Grounds; Jeff Waycaster – Garage. Scott reminisced about the things he has seen changed over the past 30 years and feels the City is at a point in history where we can prepare for tomorrow better than ever before.

The Mayor asked for an update on the sinkhole at Collett Street. Scott recapped where they were in the repair process.

IX. Public Advocacy Issues and Strategies

a. The Mayor announced the following upcoming events: TGIF concerts continue Friday nights on the Old Courthouse Square. Farmer’s Market, Saturdays behind the Train Depot and Wednesdays on North Green Street. The Mayor also announced the State of Origin Brew Festival to be held on June 10, from 5:00 – 9:00 p.m. on the Old Courthouse Square.

The Mayor reminded citizens of the presentation of the Draft Downtown Masterplan on June 7 at CoMMA at 5:30 p.m.

There will be a public input meeting for the Recreation Masterplan on June 8 at the Mountain View Recreation Center at 6:00 p.m.

The Mayor announced tickets are on sale for the Red, White & Bluegrass Festival held on July 1-3, at the Catawba Meadows Festival Area.

There will be a free Independence Day Celebration on July 4 at Catawba Meadows Park beginning 5:00 p.m. and ending with fireworks at approximately 9:30 p.m., weather permitting.

X. North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1 Update – The City Manager stated there were no current updates.

XI. Consent Agenda – The City Manager presented the consent agenda and asked if any items should be removed. No request was made.

Upon motion by Mayor Thompson, seconded by Councilman Simmons, and unanimously carried, the consent agenda was approved and each individual item adopted as stated, these being as follows:

A. Approved Minutes for a Regular Meeting held on May 1, 2017 and Special Meetings held on February 27 and May 1, 2017 as submitted.

B. Approved a Resolution #17-23 to formally close out the Fund 60 (Clearwell) Capital Project and approved a budget amendment (Ord #17-33) in the amount of $3,836 to close out the Water Clearwell Capital Project.

C. Approved a budget amendment (Ord #17-30) in the amount of $43,976 to appropriate ARC grant funds and the City’s grant match for the downtown Wi-Fi project.

D. Declared as surplus equipment a 2007 Freightliner/Allianz Johnston Sweeper truck and a 2008 International/Heil rear loader garbage truck.

XII. Items Removed from Consent Agenda – There were no items removed from the Consent Agenda.

XIII. Presentation of Proposed Budget for FY 2017-2018 – Presented by Sally Sandy, City Manager. Following is the City Manager’s Budget Message:

June 1, 2017 – Honorable Mayor and Members of the City Council

In accordance with the North Carolina Local Government Fiscal Control Act, the recommended budget for fiscal year 2017-2018 is presented for your consideration. The budget document represents balanced revenues and expenditures. Achieving a balanced budget and continuing to reinvest in our City, remains a challenge and requires cooperation from all City departments. The capital budgets include equipment replacements, facility improvements, park improvements and funding for the downtown greenway connector. The budget summary by fund is included below.

SEE PDF FOR SUMMARY

Not included in the summary above, but presented within this document, is the budget for the Intergovernmental Service Fund. This fund is an internal service fund and represents costs already accounted for within the General and Enterprise Funds. Inclusion of this fund in the statistical summary above would present these expenditures twice.

This budget contains funds for operations and the capital improvement program (CIP) in the General Fund. The General Fund capital program includes equipment purchases, routine and new funding for park improvements, and funds to upfit the newly renovated Community House. We continue to fund improvements to existing facilities. The City staff continues to pursue grant and public/private partnership opportunities to finance capital projects. Morganton Department of Public Safety aggressively seeks grants to enhance operations and assist in funding equipment purchases. General Fund CIP totals $3,597,308. Grant funding for General Fund next year is $1,859,568.

The utilities include capital programs that appropriate funding for equipment purchases, plant improvements, distribution system expenses, and infrastructure improvements. The total CIP in all utility funds is $3,582,625. As our infrastructure ages, staff continues to plan for systematic improvements. Masterplanning, rate studies and business model evaluations are taking place in all utility funds.

The 2017-2018 total budget is $73,062,657 and is $372,416 or 0.5% less than the revised budget for fiscal year 2016-2017. Large capital projects whose duration spans for more than one fiscal year or that get moved to the next fiscal year are being accounted for in project funds to prevent skewing budget to budget comparisons.

The City of Morganton continues to partner with other governmental partners in the areas of economic development, airport service, public library services, 911-Emergency Services. In the 2017-2018 budget proposal these entities are funded as follows:

Burke Development, Inc. (BDI) $ 299,142
Burke County Library 238,000
Burke County Emergency Communications 240,157
Foothills Regional Airport Authority 47,137
Total $ 824,436

These contributions represent 5.3 cents on the tax rate. The BDI contributions fund operations, local incentives to industry and debt service on the business park. Local incentives to industry are included at $113,670, an increase of $43,314 which is reflective of recent expansion announcements. The Foothills airport request includes funding for operations and $36,917 for capital. The capital request is to accumulate local matching funds for federal grants for airport improvements in the future.

The library request is $5,500 higher than last year and includes $20,000 for capital improvements at the main library. Burke County is being asked to participate in these improvements. Finally, the City continues to budget $5,000 a year to maintain the library grounds which is in addition to the requested amount in this schedule.

The operational funding for the joint 911-emergency operations continues to be budgeted at $240,157. Costs vary slightly year-to-year, depending on personnel costs. Morganton and Valdese are in discussions with Burke County regarding this funding as the other municipalities in the county do not participate in funding, but receive the service.

General Fund

The General Fund is the home of traditional government services – public safety, sanitation, street maintenance, inspections and zoning, recreation and administration. By its very nature, the General Fund houses services that are not self-supporting but instead community supporting. The General Fund is where community development meets economic development. The fund includes property taxes, sales taxes, and state collected revenues. Decisions made by the NC General Assembly can greatly affect this fund’s revenues.

Morganton is a full-service city providing all utilities including internet service. These utilities are the underpinning of our economic survival. However, for decades Morganton leaders have been intentionally supporting the philosophy that we are so much more. Quality of life, community activities, and cultural opportunities define who we are. Our long history of commitment to planning for and investing in more than basic services has set us apart from many of our neighbors.

This philosophy of being more than a basic community is one reason the State of North Carolina is investing heavily on their property inside the city limits. The planning of the new North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics – Morganton is well underway. The State’s investment of at least $58 million in that campus will be a catalyst for further development and opportunity on the 800 acres of state-owned property in Morganton. Further visioning that will address private investment and consider an amended timeline for the new Broughton Hospital is critical to the success of the district. The City and Burke County are asking the State for funding and a commitment to continue that vital planning process to ensure the State, Morganton, Burke County and our region realize the potential of that large tract of land.

The 2017-2018 proposed General Fund budget is $23,423,150. This is $384,969 less than the revised budget for 2016-2017. There are no proposed changes to services currently provided. The goal of providing quality service at the most affordable price possible, while continuing to invest in quality of life activities, facilities and initiatives that will attract new development and millennials to our City is always at the forefront of our efforts.

For the 5th year in a row, the ad valorem tax rate is recommended to remain at $0.53/$100 value. One cent on the tax rate generates approximately $155,566 which is slightly less than last year. Total ad valorem taxes for fiscal year 2017-2018 are budgeted at $8,203,000 which represents 35% of the General Fund revenues. Tax revenue is flat which is largely due to depreciation on equipment at our largest taxpayers’ facilities being greater this year than the new investment in equipment and upgrades. This is the third year that ad valorem taxes have been flat but there are several significant investments on the horizon that I hope will change this trend. Once again, I caution you that continuation of flat tax growth will ultimately lead to the necessity to consider a tax rate increase or changes in levels of service.

In the current fiscal year, in an effort to replace the $215,000 in privilege license taxes that were eliminated by the General Assembly in 2014, the City imposed a motor vehicles tax of $20. This tax is assessed on personal tagged vehicles once a year and required to be included on the motor vehicle tax bill generated by DMV. In fiscal year 2017, the estimated revenues from this tax are just under $200,000 or 1.3 cents on the tax rate. The revenue is less than budgeted because DMV could not get the billing started until August 2016 which was two months into the fiscal year. The proposed budget includes $220,000 for motor vehicles tax an equivalent of 1.4 cents on the tax rate.

Sales tax continues to be a bright spot for our community and a topic of discussion at the NC General Assembly. Sales tax is budgeted at $4,080,000 which is a 3.5% increase over current projections. Since fiscal year 2014 sales tax has grown over 27%. The growth has come through new shopping and entertainment opportunities supported by Morganton’s aggressive efforts to recruit and attract development and to grow retail – large and small, national chains and specialty shops.

Please remember that as the retail sales driver in Burke County, Morganton’s efforts support Burke County and the smaller municipalities by increasing the sales tax revenue they collect while our citizens provide the infrastructure and services to support that growth. Burke County receives 74 cents of every sales tax dollar returned to Burke County, Morganton receives just under 14 cents. The County and the smaller municipalities benefit financially from Morganton’s retail sector. Burke County uses much of that sales tax revenue to support the Burke County Public Schools. In short, a successful retail environment in Morganton, means revenues that touch every citizen in Burke County.

The downtown special tax is budgeted to remain at $0.14/$100 value and will generate approximately $117,000. One cent on the downtown tax generates approximately $8,478. The tax rate of 14 cents was set in 1995 and will fund 17.5% of the Main Street expenditures in 2017-2018.

Please notice there is a slight increase in downtown tax revenues. This is a direct result of the City’s efforts to fill spaces and support activity and property owner investment in downtown. Congratulations to Main Street, property owners, and City leaders because it is working. Results of our current Masterplan process will help guide us in continuing to support and grow a vibrant downtown.
City services in Morganton are top-notch and sanitation services are a shining example of that excellent service delivery. Backyard pick up sets us apart from other communities. However, it does not stop there – rough trash service weekly on the same day as regular pickup is exceptional. This level of service demonstrates our commitment to a clean and beautiful community in which we can all take pride. Sanitation services are supported by 25% tax revenue and 75% fee revenue. Effective July 1, 2017, the monthly residential solid waste fees are proposed to increase from $10.00/month to $12.00/month. Commercial rates are recommended to remain the same. The total revenue generated from solid waste fees next year is projected at $1,317,800.

Morganton Department of Public Safety (MDPS) is implementing a reorganization that will transition several dual role positions to just fire positions. Our commitment to the public safety concept remains strong, but in this time of uncertainty and unrest, management believes a tweak is in order. The men and women in Public Safety take seriously the pledge to serve and protect, but like other City departments, they are going a step further. They are reaching out to partner with the community. The Citizen’s Police Academy, DARE, safe sanctuary programs with the faith community, forums on opioid abuse and mental health issues and meeting with our immigrant community are just a few ways our law enforcement community creates trust and relationship building. As a department, MDPS continues to seek grant funding to support equipment upgrades. Next year’s budget includes $402,000 to support equipment purchases. During fiscal year 2017-2018 MDPS will enhance narcotics/drug enforcement by hiring and equipping a second officer dedicated to these duties.

CoMMA and Recreation continue to provide programming for all ages. The proposed budget includes funding for improvements at CoMMA including much needed parking lot lighting and landscaping changes totaling $50,000. The new season line-up offers something for all and for the first time, a chance to purchase packages for multiple shows rather than just an entire season. The parks and recreation budget includes $70,000 to resurface greenway bridges and $150,000 to air condition the gyms at Collett Street and Mountain View centers. The new skatepark and the renovated Martin Luther King Jr. Park should be completed in fall 2017.

The budget proposal includes $244,000 for upfitting the newly renovated Morganton Community House. This has truly been a community project with many private gifts to make it happen. The budget includes private donations of $85,000 already in hand to help fund the upfit and staff anticipates another $15,000 to be given early next fiscal year. In late summer, this downtown icon and gathering place will be an event venue that the community will be proud of and enjoy using.

Additionally the Development and Design department (D&D), where regulation meets development, has a hand in designing, planning, and implementing everything talked about in this budget message. These folks support the nuts and bolts that make our City great, but they also design, recruit, and help the team implement the dreams and the projects that make Morganton special. The 2017-2018 D&D budget includes funding for two important projects, $50,000 for a demonstration project for a road diet/improvement on College Street and $1,668,209 for the downtown greenway connector. The greenway connector which links downtown to Catawba Meadows through the Mountain View area is funded through federal dollars of $1,428,208 and $240,000 of City dollars.

Lastly, the General Fund budget proposal includes three different appropriations. $408,000 is a fund balance appropriation of funds set aside as a result of transitioning health insurance coverage from being self-insured to being fully-insured. These funds were ear-marked last year to cover the cost of implementing the pay and classification study. An appropriation of $270,925 from funds set aside to fund capital improvements is included. $145,727 is a general fund appropriation which represents a little less than a penny on the tax rate and ensures that we are still in compliance with the Council’s 15% fund balance policy.

Water Fund

The proposed 2017-2018 budget is $5,801,500 which is $159,241 less than the current year. No appropriation of retained earnings is required to balance the budget.

The proposed budget holds water rates steady with no increase recommended for next year. A household inside the City using 5,000 gallons of water a month will continue to pay $14.40. Outside customers pay double the inside rates. Morganton continues to have water rates lower than our neighbors and lower than similar utilities across the state. Price is only one component of value – quality must be present. The Water Department employees continue to be recognized and received State awards for optimization at the treatment plant and their exemplary safety record.

In February, Council received the updated asset masterplan and up-dated rate study for Morganton’s water system. The 20-year masterplan and rate study map out future investments and match resources and expenses to allow for periodic and planned rate increases. As our water infrastructure ages, upgrades and replacements are necessary to provide the high quality of water enjoyed by our community.

The 2017-2018 budget includes a modest capital budget of $1,777,000 that appropriates funding for water tank maintenance of $309,000 and includes $450,000 for replacing aging lines. Water usage is growing around 1% year over year. On average, system-wide usage is 49% of total capacity at about 8.8 million gallons per day. Next year’s capital improvements will include upgrades of $100,000 to the Glen Alpine pump station and a $250,000 upgrade to the coagulation sedimentation process.

Electric Fund

The total proposed electric budget for 2017-2018 is $33,532,000 which is $151,714 less than the 2016-2017 revised budget. Effective July 1, 2017, the Power Agency is passing on a wholesale rate decrease agency wide of 2%. As always, wholesale rates are based on an assumption of load growth system wide and adjusted for weather and other variable factors. In the coming fiscal year, Morganton will be losing a large electric customer due to an industry closing which will affect our realized decrease.

Over the past two years, Morganton customers received a decrease in rates of 3.28%. For the fiscal year 2017-2018, we recommend keeping electric rates the same. We are continuing our efforts to build a rate stabilization balance to off-set future wholesale rate increases. The recommended budget includes a contribution of $350,000 to rate stabilization. Our employees’ commitment to reliable power and minimizing outage times is supported by our commitment to maintain and improve our distribution system.

The proposed budget includes a CIP request of $864,500. Several trucks are being replaced including a bucket truck costing $327,500 which is being financed over several years. The multi-year upgrades to older industrial substations continue with planned investments of $140,000. The third of a three-year project to inspect all poles and make necessary replacements continues at an annual cost of $50,000.

Wastewater Fund

The total proposed budget for fiscal year 2017-2018 is $6,118,300 and, like water, includes no appropriation of retained earnings. This budget is $741,776 higher than the current year. The proposed budget includes the first debt service payment on the oxygen conversion project. Total debt service is $1,866,232 or 31% of total budget. Treated wastewater averages about 45% of daily capacity or 4.7 million gallons per day.

The updated Masterplan and rate study were presented at the City Council’s winter workshop. Just like in water, the asset plan and rate study map out necessary improvements and investments so adequate resources can be planned.

The 2017-2018 budget proposal includes a 10% sewer rate increase effective July 1, 2017. The increase is necessary to service the debt associated with the conversion from pure oxygen to traditional treatment. The increase is applied to fixed and volume charges. Two-thirds of the increase will be applied to volume on variable charges while one-third will apply to fixed charges.

An inside residential customer using 5,000 gallons of water will see a monthly sewer bill increase from $28.38 to $31.10 or an increase of $2.72. An outside residential customer of the same usage, will see an increase of $4.92 per month.

We all hate to see rates for service increase, but we have to pay for our wastewater treatment facility to be upgraded. This heavily regulated service is expensive to provide but vitally important to our daily lives and our ability to recruit and maintain industry that provide jobs. Our wastewater staff is to be commended for operating our plant in less than desirable conditions while the process conversion has been designed, permitted, and financed.

The CIP for next year totals $1,060,125 and includes line replacements, vehicle replacements, and equipment replacements. The project to convert the plant from a pure oxygen facility to a traditional treatment facility will begin in this budget year. The total project is costing $9,716,370 and is being financed by a 10-year installment purchase. The sewer capital project fund is being used to account for this improvement. The annual debt service on this project is $1,107,304.

CoMPAS Fund

The proposed budget for CoMPAS for fiscal year 2017-2018 is $4,882,459 which is $344,713 higher than current year. No appropriation of retained earnings is required to balance the budget.

In January 2016, the City contracted with a consultant to advise on best business practices to change the business model for CoMPAS or to help us assess if the business should be sold. The consultant concluded and the Council agreed that CoMPAS is a viable business that can serve the Morganton community well and generate positive cash flow with a restructure of the service. As the rural/urban divide in North Carolina widens, the ability to control our community’s investment in and delivery of high-speed internet is an economic development advantage.

The first full year of the restructure of CoMPAS is complete and progress has been made in many areas. As predicted, the market for video service through cable television continues to decline while programming costs for the service are growing at roughly 7% a year. Meanwhile, the demand for reliable and superfast internet service continues to grow. Our consultant recommended the City take advantage of excess internet capacity already in our system and grow our customer base. Growing internet customers is the key to a financially successful CoMPAS. Video programming costs in next year’s budget total $2,140,000 or 44% of total budget. During budget year 2018, CoMPAS will be dropping duplicate television channels and eliminating that cost.

During this past year, CoMPAS added 180 residential internet customers, 16 commercial internet customers, and 23 commercial phone customers. The proposed budget is based on that growth continuing. Under the direction of a new General Manager in CoMPAS, wait times for installation have decreased, interference and “noise” in the system has been reduced and a new commitment of customer service greets our customers.

In April 2017, the consultant reported that our financial decline has turned around and that our initial actions have worked, but there is more to do. To that end, the proposed budget includes:

• Effective August 1, the bundling discount of $10.00/month will drop to $5.00/month with total elimination by next year.

• Commercial internet rates will drop varying amounts based on speed.

• Commercial internet rates for fiber based on speed are being established.

• Residential internet rates will not change.

• Residential telephone rates will not change.

• Commercial telephone rates will increase to $29.99 per line per month.

• Effective January 1, 2018, broadcast basic cable service will go from $27.40/month to $30.40/month; basic cable service will go from $76.63/month to $82.63/month. These changes coincide with contractual increases to programming and renegotiation of retransmission rates for “off-air” channels.

The CIP for CoMPAS for next year totals $368,000 and includes financing a new DNCS for $165,000. The DNCS is the brain of the system that manages our video delivery system. Additionally, $80,000 is planned for equipment to allow us to continue to add internet customers. A marketing campaign to solicit new customers with some updated branding is planned for fall 2017.

Cemetery Trust Fund

The Cemetery Trust Fund is a fund designed to accumulate funds for maintaining the City owned cemetery and providing perpetual care for that property. The budget for 2017-2018 is $9,800. Lot and niche sales and marker sales remain around $9,000 annually.

The proposed budget does not include using any one-time funding from the original fund since no capital projects are planned for next year.

Intergovernmental Service Fund

The Intergovernmental Service Fund includes the Warehouse and Garage and the Information Resources Management Services (IRMS) Department. The total budget for these services for 2017-2018 is $2,166,899 which is slightly higher than last year. These departments provide services to the other funds.

The IRMS budget is $1,079,199. Much like the utilities budgets, IRMS has projects that span multi-budget years. Contracted services which include support costs for hardware and software are $323,548 or 30% of the IRMS budget. Technology continues to support how we serve our customers. Document storage and retrieval project is underway. Phase II budgeted at $50,000 is included.

The 2017-2018 budget includes $362,000 for inventory purchases which is a $10,000 increase from the current year. Purchasing and warehouse staff continue to work closely with departments to keep inventory on hand to perform required work while ensuring products on hand and costs of carrying inventory are not excessive.

The equipment services budget for 2017-2018 is $724,900 which is $5,000 less than the current budget. The fuel purchases line item at $450,000 represents 62% of total budget.

Personnel Issues

The proposed budget includes funding for 287 positions. The proposed budget includes funding to reclassify the recreation concession coordinator to a ¾ position, to hire an athletic supervisor in the recreation department, to hire a ¾ kitchen and banquet assistant for the Community House beginning in November, and to hire a second narcotics investigator in Public Safety beginning in January 2018. These position changes will allow Morganton to continue to provide excellent services to our citizens. Morganton’s commitment to funding two full-time narcotics investigators who will continue to work cooperatively with other law enforcement entities is a right step forward tackling the challenges that illegal drug activity causes in our City.

In the current fiscal year, the Council funded a pay/classification study. Recognizing competitive pay practices are necessary to attract and retain the well-trained and motivated work force that is critical to our service delivery and to the type of community we are, the Council received the results of the study. The study results identified a few areas where our pay ranges need adjusting to be market competitive. The study also revealed significant pay compression near the bottom of the pay ranges. Due to several years with furloughs and no merit increases, there was no vehicle to move employees further along in the pay ranges. This caused challenges in attracting and hiring the best candidates.

The proposed budget includes $407,541 to implement the pay study and make adjustments to address the compression issues. Insurance savings of $450,000 were set aside in reserve last year to fund any recommendations that were made as a result of the pay study. Employees will receive increases in pay effective the pay period beginning July 8, 2017. Increases will range from 2% to 6% based on a formula which weights years of service in current position and years of service with the City. This step moves employees further into the pay ranges and reduces some of the compression at the lower end of the ranges.

A future commitment to a merit system which rewards high performing employees and provides the opportunity to advance in their pay ranges will be the next step in providing market competitive pay practices. This is needed to ensure the City of Morganton is an employer of choice, attracting and retaining a qualified and motivated work force that is needed to create and maintain the quality community that has become the City’s reputation. Because of the decision to fund the pay study, this budget does not include funds for a COLA or merit increase.

The total cost budgeted for insurance benefits next year is $1,866,924 for active employees and $869,165 for retirees. Law enforcement separation allowance has decreased by $31,666 and is funded at $158,003 next year.

Summary

The 2017-2018 proposed budget is $73,062,657. The budget appropriates funding to continue all basic service at the same level currently enjoyed by our citizens and our visitors. In order to do that, solid waste fees are proposed to increase and sewer rates are proposed to increase. CoMPAS fees for video service are increasing and commercial internet and phone fees are changing. Ad valorem tax rates are proposed to remain the same, as are electric and water rates. All in all, I believe this is a very responsible budget that allows us to serve the citizens well.

Normally, this is the place where I would take advantage of editorial privilege and make reference to a movie, drawing inspiration from the script to challenge us to think broadly, honor the past, keep the big picture in mind and always be brave enough to look toward the future. However, this year I am finding my inspiration elsewhere.

In the past several weeks, I have been reminded by our downtown masterplan consultants that successful downtowns plan for PEOPLE first. About the tenth time during the charrette week that I heard PEOPLE first I was reminded that public servants exist because of people. Actually, I would expand the PEOPLE first concept, to say that successful COMMUNITIES put people first. Certainly, we all aspire for Morganton to be a successful community.

As a matter of fact, in this very budget message, I have used the word community thirty-two times. So, what is a community? According to Merriam Webster one definition of a community is a “unified body of individuals who have a joint ownership or participation”. What a perfect description of Morganton. Morganton is a community where the employees and citizens take pride and ownership in the safety, the appearance, the culture, the activities, and the economic opportunities that make us who we are. It is also a place where we encourage and embrace participation and input from citizens, visitors, our neighbors, Burke County, Burke County Public Schools, employers, and our faith community in determining where we want to go and who we want to be. It is through participation and partnership that we find our greatest strengths and achieve our biggest successes.

Morganton has been blessed for decades with leadership that has not settled for mediocrity. Even through tough economic times, we have found ways through our partnerships and relationships to provide excellent services, to invest in the community’s future, and to work toward a success that offers something for everyone. I believe this proposed budget continues that tradition. It requires responsible and reasonable investments by the taxpayers and ratepayers to ensure Morganton is putting PEOPLE first on its way to a successful community.

I would like to thank the City Council for accepting the challenge to serve the community, making decisions that affect our success today and in the future. I always appreciate the cooperation and team effort of the professional department directors who help to put this budget together. Special thanks and appreciation to Karen Duncan, Finance Director and Michael Chapman, Deputy Finance Officer, whose tireless efforts and commitment to it being right are unmatched. I could not do this without them.

It is truly my privilege to be allowed to serve with a team of PEOPLE who believe in serving the PEOPLE and for a COMMUNITY that understands the value in ownership and participation in the success of Morganton. Our future is bright and I remain excited to continue to work with our elected leaders, the City team, the citizens and other partners to ensure that Morganton reaches the potential available to us.

As I look back at the changes in Morganton over the last ten years, I am energized and amazed. I cannot wait to see what happens in the next ten years.

Respectfully submitted,

Sally W. Sandy, CPA
City Manager

At the end of the presentation the City Manager reiterated that, “Community is our inspiration…to think broadly, to keep the big picture in mind, to achieve success through ownership and partnership, to embrace the future, not just in our words but in our actions.” She then highlighted various items in the budget and offered to answer any questions from the Council.

a. Consideration for a Call for a Public Hearing on the Proposed Budget on Monday, June 19, 2017, 6:00 p.m.

Upon motion by Councilman Fleming, seconded by Councilman Cantrell, and carried unanimously, the Council called for and approved a meeting to be held on Monday, June 19, 2017 at 6:00 p.m. to hold a public hearing and vote on the proposed budget.

XIV. Old Business

1. Consideration of Removing $20 Vehicle Tax

The City Manager stated that a $20 per vehicle tax was adopted by City Council last year, primarily to provide a revenue source to replace the loss of all privilege license taxes. Indeed, helping replace the lost PLT revenue was one of the reasons behind the General Assembly’s action in amending the statutes to allow municipalities to charge up to $25 per vehicle as a local tax. It was noted by the Manager that this tax is assessed on all tagged vehicles which includes people who don’t own real property, but who do use the road system.

At the May 1, 2017 City Council meeting, Councilman Simmons made a motion to rescind or abolish the tax or fee of $20 per motor vehicle owned within the City. It was noted that this charge is part of the City budget/schedule of fees and charges, and would normally be addressed during the annual budget planning process. Councilman Fleming asked the motion be “tabled” until the June 5 Council Meeting. Councilman Cantrell seconded the motion, which then passed unanimously.

Although Councilman Fleming’s motion was designated as one to “table”, it actually was in the nature of a motion to postpone to a specific date. Thus, the matter is on the agenda for the June 5 meeting as an item of old or unfinished business. Since Councilman Simmons’ motion was duly seconded, it is now before Council for discussion and/or decision.

The Mayor called for a vote on the motion. The Council voted 2-2 (Simmons and Thompson – yay / Cantrell and Fleming – nay) so the motion did not pass.

XV. New Business

A. Public Hearings and Actions

1. Public Hearing to Consider Rezoning a 20.52 Acre Portion of a 37.42 Acre Tract of Property Located at 925 N Green Street from Low Intensity District (LID) to High Intensity District (HID) Submitted by Nathan Tidd Agent for Crescent Communities

The Mayor opened the public hearing at 6:39 p.m.

Phillip Lookadoo stated the property proposed for rezoning is located in the northwest portion of the City of Morganton with direct frontage on Independence Blvd. The total tract is 37.42 acres of which 20.52 acres is proposed for rezoning. The total tract is in two separate zoning districts (HID and LID) with the portion proposed for rezoning fronting on Independence Blvd.

The entire tract itself is bordered by Independence Blvd on the southeast, properties bordering North Green Street/NC181 on the northeast, and Branstrom Drive along with other properties fronting Branstrom Drive on the west.

This item was considered by the Planning & Zoning Commission on May 11, 2017 and upon a unanimous vote, recommended for approval by City Council. Staff has reviewed the objectives of the Mission 2030 Plan and finds that this action is in compliance with the goals and objectives set forth in the Plan.

A Public Hearing Notice, for June 5, 2017 was advertised in the Morganton News Herald on May 24, 2017 and May 31, 2017. First Class mail notices were mailed to all property owners of record as well as property owners adjacent to the subject properties on May 23, 2017 and a Rezoning Notice Sign was placed in each subject area.

• Scott Coley resides at 418 Alexander Avenue. Coley stated he was the co-president of the Historic Burke Foundation (HBF) which owns several properties in the area. He stated HBF, and it’s Executive Committee, wanted to make a “qualified statement of support” for rezoning this tract of land. He stated this provides a great opportunity to connect historic properties as well as Freedom Park and Freedom High School. He stated that HBF would like to see sensitive development which could connect the Charles McDowell House to the Quaker Meadows Cemetery and greenway. He stated development in this area will enhance the River District.

The Mayor questioned if trails could be built in a High Intensity District. Phillip Lookadoo, Director of Development & Design, stated that trails could definitely be built.

• Nathan Tidd, Kinley & Associates, 200 South Tryon Street, Charlotte. Tidd urged approval and stated that Crescent would grant rights-of-way for multimodal paths.

There being no further public comment, the Mayor closed the public hearing at 7:08 p.m.

Upon motion by Councilman Cantrell, seconded by Councilman Simmons, and carried unanimously, the Council adopted Ordinance #17-31 that amends the Zoning Map of the City of Morganton to rezone parcels from their present Low Intensity District (LID) zoning classification to a High Intensity District (HID) zoning classification based on compliance with the Mission 2030 Plan and recommendation by the Planning and Zoning Commission.

2. Public Hearing to Consider Rezoning Approximately 54.45 Acres Located at 526 Causby Road from Exclusive Industrial District (EID) to Medium Intensity District (MID) Submitted by Howard E. Poole Trustees

The Mayor opened the public hearing at 7:10 p.m.

Phillip Lookadoo stated this 54.45 acres consists of three tracts. The tracts are adjacent to each other, are under single ownership, and have direct frontage on Causby Road. Two of the three tracts are larger vacant tracts of land (45.22 and 11.03 acres respectively) and the third is a smaller tract (.79 acres) containing a brick home. At their May 11, 2017 meeting, the planning board recommended rezoning of all three tracts from EID to MID.

Staff reviewed the objectives of the Mission 2030 Plan and found that this requested action is not in compliance with the goals and objectives set forth in the 2030 Plan. The Planning and Zoning Commission, after holding a public hearing on the matter on May 11, 2017, considered the information provided by staff and obtained in the public hearing. Based on issues with topography, lot dimensions and access difficulties; the commission recommended, by a unanimous vote, approval by City Council.

A Public Hearing Notice was advertised in the Morganton News Herald on May 24, 2017 and May 31, 2017. First Class mail notices were mailed to all property owners of record as well as property owners adjacent to the subject properties on May 23, 2017 and a Rezoning Sign Notice was placed in each subject area.

• Steven West resides at 30 Stoney Ridge Asheville. He stated he was owner of an adjacent property and was favorable of approval. He stated his property is MID and the gap between zoning types does not seem to fit.

There being no further public comment, the Mayor closed the public hearing at 7:16 p.m.

Councilman John Cantrell asked to be recused due to family interest in an adjoining property that might create a conflict. Upon motion by Councilman Simmons, seconded by Councilman Fleming all voted to excuse Cantrell.

Upon motion by Councilman Simmons, seconded by Councilman Fleming, and carried unanimously (3-0, Councilman Cantrell was excused from voting), the Council confirmed that the requested map amendments are in compliance with the spirit and intent of the Morganton Mission 2030 goals and objectives given practical considerations identified by the Planning and Zoning Commission.
Councilman Fleming asked to what purpose does the property owner want this tract rezoned. The City Attorney stated in considering a rezoning, the potential use of the property is not an appropriate line of inquiry. The question is whether the rezoning is appropriate under our ordinance and the uses would be whatever is allowed in an MID district. Phillip Lookadoo stated there has been no plan submitted. He stated in an MID there could be single family, multi-family or industrial depending upon the type of road frontage. There is no exact plan, indications are that it could be multi-family residential.

Councilman Simmons asked if this change would make the property more marketable. Lookadoo stated it likely would.

Upon motion by Councilman Simmons, seconded by Councilman Fleming, and carried unanimously (3-0 with Councilman Cantrell excused from voting), the Council adopted Ordinance #17-32 that amends the Zoning Map of the City of Morganton to rezone parcels from their Exclusive Industrial District (EID) zoning classification to a Medium Intensity District (MID) zoning classification.

B. Other Business

1. Consideration of Neighborhood-wide Speed Limit of 25 mph in the Residential Neighborhood that Includes Brittain Drive, White Pine Lane and Glendale Street

The City Attorney stated that responding to requests from residents on Brittain Drive, a traffic engineering evaluation was conducted with regard to the above-referenced residential area within the city limits of the City of Morganton. The traffic engineering evaluation primarily focused on the nature and characteristics of the nearby street network. The streets listed above are all narrow, local residential streets whose primary function is to provide access to the residences along those streets. It should be noted as well that no sidewalks are available for residents on these streets - they must use the streets for walking and other pedestrian activities. Currently, no speed limit signs are posted on these streets except for Glendale Street (posted at 35 mph). Therefore, by default they fall under the citywide speed limit of 35 mph. While mobility, that is speed or ease of traffic flow, is still necessary on these streets; the role of mobility is not as vital in a residential setting as it would be on an arterial street or a collector street. From a traffic engineering and safety standpoint, these residential streets are located off Carbon City Road / Highway 70 between Morganton and Glen Alpine, with Brittain Drive and Glendale Street providing the connections to Carbon City Road / Highway 70. Logically, there should be some distinction and hierarchy between Carbon City Road / Highway 70 and these residential streets in terms of speed limit, just as there is in function of the streets. Consequently, the residential streets listed above should fall under an umbrella speed limit of 25 mph for the neighborhood along these streets. And as a result, the appropriate neighborhood speed limit signs should be posted at the appropriate locations leading into the neighborhood for enforcement.

Upon motion by Councilman Fleming, seconded by Councilman Simmons, and carried unanimously, the Council approved implementing an umbrella 25 MPH Speed Limit for the neighborhood that includes Brittain Drive, White Pine Lane, and Glendale Street and the installation of the appropriate “Neighborhood Speed Limit 25 mph” signs. (Ord #17-34)

2. Consideration of Ordinance Establishing a Speed Limit of 25 mph on the Portion of Vine Arden Road North of the Kirksey Bypass

The City Attorney stated that the portion of Vine Arden that extends essentially north away from the Kirksey Bypass is a relatively narrow, dead-end, strictly residential local street that also serves the Wastewater Treatment Plant. Responding to a request, an engineering evaluation was conducted. This section of Vine Arden Road is currently posted with a 35 mph speed limit. However, due to the vehicular usage and its function as a local residential street as well as the inherent characteristics of the roadway, the City Engineer recommends that the appropriate speed limit of 25 mph be posted for this street for the safety of the residents as well as the traveling public driving on this street. As further argument for the 25 mph speed limit, a small portion of this section of Vine Arden Road is already posted at 25 mph near the entrance to the Wastewater Treatment plant. In addition, the other portion of Vine Arden Road south of the Kirksey Bypass to Rockyford Road is already posted at 25 mph.

Upon motion by Councilman Simmons, seconded by Councilman Cantrell, and carried unanimously, the Council approved authorizing a reduction of the speed limit from the current 35 mph and establishing a new 25 mph posted speed limit on a section of Vine Arden Road.

3. Consideration of Neighborhood-wide Speed Limit of 25 mph in the Residential Neighborhood that Includes Kimberly Drive and North Fox Street

The City Attorney stated that, responding to requests from residents, a traffic engineering evaluation was conducted with regard to the above-referenced residential area within the city limits of the City of Morganton. The traffic engineering evaluation primarily focused on the nature and characteristics of the nearby street network. The streets listed above are local residential streets whose primary function is to provide access to the residences along those streets. It should be noted as well that no sidewalks are available for residents on these streets they must use the streets for walking and other pedestrian activities. Currently, no speed limit signs are posted on these streets; therefore, by default they fall under the citywide speed limit of 35 mph. While mobility, that is speed or ease of traffic flow, is still necessary on these streets, the role of mobility is not as vital in a residential setting as it would be on an arterial street or a collector street. From a traffic engineering and safety standpoint, these residential streets are located off Alexander Avenue, which would be classified as a collector street and which has a posted speed limit of 25 mph. Logically, if the collector street, Alexander Avenue, has a posted speed limit of 25 mph, then these two local residential streets should not have speed limits higher than the collector street they feed off. Consequently, the residential streets listed above should fall under an umbrella speed limit of 25 mph for the neighborhood along these streets. And as a result, the appropriate neighborhood speed limit signs should be posted at the appropriate locations leading into the neighborhood for enforcement.

Upon motion by Councilman Cantrell, seconded by Councilman Simmons, and carried unanimously, the Council approved implementing an umbrella 25 MPH Speed Limit for the Neighborhood that includes Kimberly Drive and North Fox Street and the installation of the appropriate “Neighborhood Speed Limit 25 mph” signs.

4. Appointments to Boards and Commissions

a. Human Relations Commission

There are two terms on the Human Relations Commission that are expiring; the terms of Mary Wright and Alma Yanez.

Both have been consistent members of the Human Relations Commission. Mary Wright expressed willingness to continue serving. Alma Yanez did not wish to be reappointed. Gerald McBrayer has expressed interest in serving on this commission.

This is a Mayoral appointment. The Mayor reappointed Mary Wright and appointed Gerald McBrayer to serve on the Human Relations Commission for terms to expire on June 3, 2020.

b. Board of Adjustment

There is one term on the Board of Adjustment that is expiring; the term of Susan Shelor. Ms. Shelor has been a consistent member of the Board of Adjustment and she has expressed a willingness to continue serving.

Upon motion by Councilman Cantrell, seconded by Councilman Fleming, and carried unanimously, the Council approved reappointing Susan Shelor to the Board of Adjustment for a term to expire June 3, 2020.

c. Cable Television Commission

There are three terms on the Cable Television Commission that are expiring; the terms of Jim Cates, Barry Stock and Dennis Caldwell. All have been consistent members of the Cable Television Commission and have expressed willingness to continue serving.

Upon motion by Councilman Fleming, seconded by Councilman Cantrell, and carried unanimously, the Council reappointed Jim Cates, Barry Stock and Dennis Caldwell to the Cable Television Commission for terms to expire June 3, 2020.

d. Community Appearance

There are three terms on the Community Appearance Commission that are expiring. Bill Allman and Martha Franklin have expressed willingness to continue serving. Nan McMahon does not wish to be reappointed at this time. James B. Bagley is interested in serving on this Commission

This is a Mayoral appointment. The Mayor reappointed Bill Allman and Martha Franklin and appointed James B. Bagley to serve on the Community Appearance Commission for terms to expire on June 3, 2020.

e. Main Street Advisory

There are five terms on the Main Street Advisory Commission that are expiring; the terms of Dianne Reihl, Judy Willis, Ben Belton, Bryant Lindsey and Eddie McGimsey. All have been consistent members of the Main Street Advisory Commission and have expressed willingness to continue serving.

This will leave one vacancy on this commission. Jennifer Whittington has also expressed an interest in serving on this commission.

This is a Mayoral appointment. The Mayor reappointed Dianne Reihl, Judy Willis, Ben Belton, Bryant Lindsey and Eddie McGimsey to the Main Street Advisory Commission for terms to expire June 3, 2020 and appointed Jennifer Whittington to fulfill a term to expire on June 3, 2018.

f. Planning & Zoning

There are three terms on the Planning & Zoning Commission that are expiring; the terms of David Kirk, Donald Smith, Jr. and Rick Lingerfelt. Mr. Smith and Mr. Lingerfelt have been consistent members of the Planning & Zoning Commission and have expressed willingness to continue serving. Mr. Kirk’s schedule does not allow him to attend meetings and therefore his seat will become vacant. There were two interested applicants for this position: Marc Sholar and Edward C. Gildea

Based on prior service on the Planning Commission and familiarity with the Mission 2030 plan, staff recommended that Marc Sholar be appointed.

Upon motion by Councilman Cantrell, seconded by Councilman Simmons, and carried unanimously, the Council reappointed Don Smith and Rick Lingerfelt and appointed Marc Sholar to the Planning & Zoning Commission for terms to expire June 3, 2020.

g. Recreation Advisory

There are three terms on the Recreation Advisory Commission that are expiring; the terms of Daniel Hernandez, Jimmy Holland and John Whisnant.

This commission does not allow successive terms so there will be no reappointments. Those who have expressed an interest in serving on this commission include: Mike Hasson, Jose Garcia, Chris Witherspoon, Thomas Reep, and Scott Davis.

Councilman Fleming moved to appoint Mike Hasson, Thomas Reep and Scott Davis to the Recreation Advisory Commission for terms to expire June 3, 2020.

Councilman Simmons stated he would like to nominate Chris Witherspoon.

The City Attorney stated there was a motion on the table from Councilman Fleming. It had not been seconded.

Councilman Cantrell asked the City Attorney what happens in a case like this. The City Attorney suggested voting for each nominee individually.

Councilman Fleming withdrew his original motion, then made a motion to appoint Mike Hasson to the Recreation Advisory Commission for a term to expire June 3, 2020, seconded by Councilman Cantrell and carried unanimously.

Councilman Fleming made a motion to appoint Thomas Reep to the Recreation Advisory Commission for a term to expire June 3, 2020, seconded by Councilman Simmons and carried unanimously.

Councilman Cantrell made a motion to appoint Chris Witherspoon to the Recreation Advisory Commission for a term to expire June 3, 2020, seconded by Councilman Simmons and carried unanimously.

XVI. Other Items from City Manager and City Council Not on Agenda – There were no other items on the agenda.

XVII. Reports – Reports were distributed for information.

XVIII. Adjournment – The meeting was adjourned at 7:32 p.m.

Preparation of Minutes. These minutes were prepared by Mikela D. Russell, Assistant City Clerk. Copies of all resolutions, ordinances and orders referenced in these minutes are intended to be incorporated into these minutes as if fully set forth herein. Prior to including them into the official minute book, the minutes have been read and approved by the City Manager and the City Attorney, then distributed to each member of the City Council for further review and final approval, at a subsequent Council Meeting.

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